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Posts Tagged ‘Denali National Park’

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These are bite marks on quaking aspen nearly seven feet up the three.

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And some shed out hair. Moose have hollow hair like white-tailed deer, but it’s based upon on a much larger scale. They also have a much denser undercoat.

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The moose weren’t on the trail that day, but they weren’t that far off.

 

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I really haven’t felt myself in maybe a decade. I felt myself here in the taiga.

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These were taken with my telephoto lens, and they were quite a distance off.

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I post these photos from South Carolina. They were taken over a month ago from the lodge where I was staying near Denali National Park.

They might as well have come from a different universe.

But they are from the same country.

These calves had their mother and thus had a fighting chance against the bears and wolves.

I hope they are doing well now.

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Any time someone from the Lower 48 goes to Alaska, the instant question that comes up on return is the traveler encountered a wolf.

The answer for me is simply no, and I knew fully well there were very low odds of me seeing a wolf. I live where there are tons of coyotes, and I see one about every six months. They are very good at keeping themselves hidden from people, and from what I’ve read about wild wolves, it is even more true about wolves.

Some members of my family went to the Kroschel Wildlife Center and saw a tame wolf named Isis. (I was told that she would not stop howling during their entire visit!).

My best chance at seeing a wild wolf was at Denali, but there is a catch to that story.

Denali National Park is roughly the size of Massachusetts. It’s full of moose, Dall sheep, caribou, beaver, and porcupines.

You’d think that place would be full of wolves, but it’s not.

In fact, a place that size really can’t hold as many wolves as it does wolf prey. Because wolves are top predators, they just can’t exist in such large numbers, and that fact is true regardless if you’re talking about wolves in Denali, cheetahs in Namibia, or lions in the Gir Forest.

So even in the best of times, there would always be just a few wolves roaming the park. They would be laid on pretty thinly on the land.

But these are not the best of times for wolves in Denali.

The traditional “buffers” that have been set up near the park that prevented legal wolf hunting and trapping near the park were lifted in 2010, and the wolf population went from 147 wolves in 2007 to 49 wolves in 2015.

49 wolves over a land the size of Massachusetts.

49 is still more than the number of wolves living in actual Massachusetts, which may be 0 wolves. It may not be, though. One was killed in Massachusetts in 2008, and one or two  could be lurking somewhere in the Berkshires, where they may mistaken for big coyotes.

But 49 is roughly a third of what the population was nearly a decade ago. My chances of seeing a wolf in Denali were 45 percent in 2010. They were 5 percent in 2015.

One of the best things I did at the park was take a hiking nature tour. My tour guide was very well-informed about wolf issues, and she told us about a wolf following one of her tour groups. There was no fear involved, but when someone in the party pointed out that a wolf was following them, she was certain it was a dog. She was very surprised to see that it was a wolf, and it was close.

The wolf ran off, of course.

But she also told the story of what happened to the East Fork wolf pack. This is the famous wolf pack that Adolph Murie studied. They were the wolves that were featured prominently in The Wolves of Mt. McKinley. This was the pack to which Wags, Murie’s tame wolf belonged.

Right now, the pack exists as only a single female. Her mate was killed on state land near the park entrance. She also had a litter, but I’ve not been able to find out what exactly happened to them. (I was there just a few days after this story came out on Alaska NPR).

I understand that Alaska has to balance interests between outfitters, who want predator control and liberal predator hunting allowances, and the desire of the American people to have relatively intact ecosystems in our national parks.

I get it.

I get that Canis lupus isn’t an endangered species worldwide, and it certainly isn’t an endangered species in Alaska, where the species is still going strong.

But it seems just a little perverse that we cannot maintain those buffers once again. I came thousands of miles to see wilderness where wolves might be.

I am okay with knowing they might be. I don’t have to see them. I just need to know they are there.

We had a small enough tour group that the guide and I got to talk about wolves a bit. She talked about her cocker spaniel and how that dog was far more rugged than she looked. The dog had been on many back country trips, and she wondered how closely related her spaniel was to those wolves.

Pretty close.

But still far enough away.

 

 

 

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I believe these are mew gulls, and they had three chicks that wandered among the landscaping rocks and spruce trees at the lodge at Denali National Park.

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I didn’t see any wolves while I was in Alaska, but I did get to see the sled dog demonstration at Denali National Park. The dogs were originally  brought in to pull rangers doing anti-poaching patrols, and during the winters now, they are still used to patrol the back country.

The dogs got really excited to do their job! I wasn’t in the best position to see them pull the sled, but they did it at top speed!

The ones that didn’t get to run still got worked up, and they started making noise as soon as they knew a demonstration was about to happen.

The public got to meet the dogs before the demo.

Some were in runs because they were either in heat or couldn’t stop eating rocks.

But they were all beautiful.

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She never left the fence. She stayed in that position so she could be petted for as long as possible.

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These two moose calves were at the entrance to Denali National Park, when I was taking the bus to a sled dog demonstration. (The same day I also caught the grayling).

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These photos were taken from a bus. I was not on foot.

When I was on foot in moose cow and calf country, I finally realized what it’s like to be a little dog wandering around white-tailed deer when the does give birth. At any moment, there could be a ticked off ungulate coming at me!

Update (8 July 16):  I had heard rumors that the moose calves’ mother had been shot. It is true, and because they were hanging out so close to people, the park captured them today for relocation.  

 

 

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