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Posts Tagged ‘Jim Dutcher’

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I’m not posting this to hear the usual complaints about the Dutchers. I know what they are.

I just don’t want hear them on this post, please.

I always enjoyed Jim and Jamie Dutcher’s films about this pack, which was not “untamed” but was very much habituated to humans.

I think some of the complaints about them do raise important questions about the ethics of keeping wolves in captivity for filming purposes. However, I certainly don’t think that the Dutchers were callous toward them.

Indeed, their attachment too them runs through these films.

In their book about the Sawtooth pack, the Dutchers write that after doing those films, they can’t make nature documentaries about anything else.

I suppose that some of this might have something to do with our evolutionary past. Although we have historically reviled wolves since we have become an agricultural species, we have a longer history of partnership with them.

We are linked to them. I’m sure that’s why we love dogs, and why it is so easy to get people to get romantic ideas about wolves.

Conversely, I’m also sure that persecuting wolves may have something to do with this unusual relationship. To deny one’s wildness, one must revile the wolf. To show respect for it, one must celebrate it.

It is a paradox. We are either hot or cold with this species.

I’m warm to them. I’ll admit my bias.

***

The Dutchers have a nonprofit. Its website is here.

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I’ve always loved the documentaries about this pack.

I’ve also read the Dutchers’ book, which has pretty good insights into the intimate lives of wolves.

If you look at how their size and stature compares to the people in this film,  it is very obvious how different these big game hunting wolves from the northern parts of North America are from domestic dogs.

But they are also similar.

 

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Living with Wolves

Source.

I’ve always loved the documentaries about this pack.

I’ve also read the Dutchers’ book, which has pretty good insights into the intimate lives of wolves.

If you look at how their size and stature compares to the people in this film,  it is very obvious how different these big game hunting wolves from the northern parts of North America are from domestic dogs.

But they are also similar.

 

Read Full Post »

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