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Posts Tagged ‘Norwegian elkhound’

One looks like a jaemthund, and the other looks like a Norwegian gray:

The Norwegian gray elkhound is commonly used in West Virginia as a general squirrel and varmint dog.

One of the oldest ways to hunt game with dogs– perhaps the oldest— is to have the dogs harass large quarry, providing just enough distraction to allow a person to shoot it from a distance with a gun, arrow, or spear.

These are the dogs that most commonly fall victim to wolf attacks in Scandinavia. It makes some sense. In most areas where these dogs are used, the dogs travel quite a distance from their handlers, and when they catch up to the moose they start barking. Barking is an attractant to any wolves in the area, and wolves don’t tolerate other “wolves” on their turf.

I will always love Norwegian elkhounds. I spent a lot of my childhood around one that was quite good-natured but also quite stubborn and mischievous. I remember he would let me put kibble in his ears, which he would flick out as a game. And he adopted a Muscovy duckling, which unfortunately met its demise when he tried to discipline it as if it were a puppy.

But he was a serious hunter who took out his fair share of raccoons. One of his ears was permanently flopped over from a battle he had with a raccoon under an outbuilding.

He was my grandfather’s last elkhound, and he was the only one I got to know really well. My grandpa loved this breed because it requires almost no training to hunt squirrels and varmints. Most are fine natural treeing dogs, and they can balance their instincts with a desire to please man.

I wonder what Frito would have done if he had been used moose. He used to chase my grandpa’s horse every evening. It was one of their rituals. My grandpa would go out to feed the horse, and Frito would bay up and circle the horse, who though it was fun enough game to allow himself to be herded in this fashion.

So he may not have ever seen a moose, but he knew what to do with a horse.

So maybe he would have known what to do had he encountered a giant deer-horse.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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My dad is holding Huddles (dachshund), my uncle is holding Willy (beagle), and Fonzi (Norwegian elkhound) is barking at the gray fox they are holding on the table.

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Frito

I am about 3 years old in this photo. I’m on my grandparents’ back deck. Frito was my grandpa’s Norwegian elkhound, who was of mixed black and gray lines.

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I am in the two-year-old range in this photo.  Bull is the collie lying close to the house, while Frito is the Norwegian elkhound, who was part black and part gray elkhound. Yes, my hair actually was that blond!

Sorry about the resolution of this film. I have been taking these photos of these older photos with my iPAD2, and the resolution just isn’t that great.

 

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(Source for image)

The gråwachtel is a purpose-bred crossbreed.

It is a mixture of elkhound, usually Norwegian gray, and the German spaniel, which is called the wachtelhund (“quail dog.”)

Now, what would you suppose this dog was bred to hunt?

Well, they were bred to hunt wild boar.

Source.

The can also be used to hunt moose.

These dogs look a lot like golden retriever/Norwegian elkhound crosses that I’ve seen.

German spaniels are close to golden retrievers in size, and I saw a red-colored German spaniel in Munich that looked a lot like a golden retriever.

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Source.

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This dog’s image comes from a site that says it is 40 percent “Timberwolf” and 60 percent “Norwegian elkhound.”

I don’t know if those percentages are accurate or if this dog has any recent wolf ancestry at all.

But it is said to howl. Norwegian elkhounds really don’t howl. They are know for their barks. I remember my grandpa’s elkhound would rake his back on the lower rung of a split-rail fence in the front yard, and he would bark each time he raked his back against the rail.

I don’t know why anyone would puff an elkhound as being part wolf.

All Norwegian and Swedish elkhounds can have relatively recent wolf ancestry. 

I am skeptical that this particular dog is of recent wolf ancestry.  It might be. It looks more like a wolf than the F1 poodle/wolf crosses that Erik Zimen bred.

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