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Posts Tagged ‘squirrel’

Two crows got on camera as they ate turkey leftovers, but a gray squirrel got captured too.

You’re gonna have to look hard to see him though.

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Trying to smell it.

IMG_5446

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Miley treed a squirrel today, but after it took to the trees, it let loose quite few alarm calls:

Source.

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The branches of a hickory tree reach across the well-tender’s road to another.

The squirrels can eat all the hickory nuts they want and never have to cross the ground.

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Remember these two squirrels?

On a previous post, I said that these animals were hybrids between Eurasian red squirrels and North American Eastern gray squirrels, which are an introduced species in the United Kingdom.

I said that the squirrel in the top photo had been a confirmed hybrid, and because the other squirrel happened to be black, it was suggested that it was a hybrid between a melanistic gray squirrel and red squirrel.

Well, I was pulling your leg.

I’ve had one person check out the Wikipedia page on red squirrels and inform me that the gray one was actually a Eurasian red squirrel in its winter pelt.  Though becoming rarer in the British Isles, red squirrels are still quite wide-ranging animals, and they vary greatly in color throughout their range and throughout the year.

The black squirrel isn’t even a gray squirrel or a red squirrel.

It is a melanistic Abert’s squirrel (Sciurus aberti), which is a species native to the southern Rockies.

Long-time readers know that I’m somewhat prone to pulling pranks.

And I like to keep you on your toes…

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Source.

This comes from a documentary called Daylight Robbery.

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Source.

If my dog caught a squirrel, my reaction would be the exact opposite. I’d be more like “Hell, yes!”

I don’t know why people have issues with dogs engaging in predatory behavior. Of course, these are very often the same people who have issues with people engaging in similar behavior. (They usually don’t have a problem with cats doing this, and cats do it even more often and with greater efficiency than any dog.)

I mean this is a Weimaraner, a hunter, pointer, and retriever (HPR).

Oh, I forgot.

Miley did catch a huge fox squirrel a few weeks ago. It was sitting out in the pasture and was too far from any tree to escape. She caught it, but because she is a retriever, she couldn’t actually kill it. So she carried it around alive in her mouth, which gave the big squirrel an opportunity to fight back.

And it fought back.

And it took refuge in a tree.

 

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