Feeds:
Posts
Comments

junggarsuchus

We got a cat

037

And I found a nice track:

091

I’ve put out some catnip to see if we can get some better photos of Lynx rufus.

dog idiots

This is why I don’t blog as much about dogs as I once did.

On the trail camera this week, I got two interesting animals:

An alien black cat:

001

And a striped skunk:

011

This is the first skunk I’ve been able to get on the trail camera, which adds one more carnivoran family to the list.

No. Skunks aren’t Mustelids anymore. Their family is Mephitidae, This family includes two Southeast Asian “stink badgers” and all the skunks of North and South America.

The most common species of skunk in West Virginia is the striped skunk, but in the very high Alleghenies there is a relict population of Eastern spotted skunks.  Eastern spotted skunks are thought of as a “Southern” species, but in West Virginia, they are found only in the colder High Alleghenies.

I just hope that black cat stays away from white paint.

There are plenty of Pepe Le Pew cartoons that tell you what happens when a black cat gets a white stripe painted on it!

050

044

046

051

Just a pair of ravens playing in the sky on an August morning.

A little buck bedded down in a thicket, thinking he is hidden:

106

But I was able to get some close-ups:

107

Including of his vibrissae:

109

White-tailed deer bed down in thickets to chew their cuds, which is how ruminants digest their food.

It’s the same concept as a cow, but unlike a cow, deer make sure they are pretty well-hidden before they do set about this task.

Bound and leap

Little spikehorn on the run.

001

002

003

004

005

006

007

008

009

010

011

012

013

014

015

016

017

019

020

021

022

023

018

024

025

026

027

These photos were possible solely by luck.

I just happened to have the camera on the setting that allows me to take multiple shots per second, and I just came across a dopey little spikehorn that thought the best way to run away from me was to run at me.

So I was able to get the full sequence of him bounding about.

Unlike mule deer, white-tailed deer don’t stot. Stotting is a behavior that communicates to predators that a deer is healthy, but because white-tails evolved in the forest, they really can’t communicate anything to predators as they run off.

So they have these bounding gazelle leaps that do help them clear a lot of country in a very short time.

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 1,119 other followers

%d bloggers like this: